The Living Situation: Work it, girl

Work it girlI never really imagined how challenging it would be to get any projects finished with a toddler in the house. She’s constantly on the move, which means I am, too. So I was actually pretty pumped when I learned that my workspace would be moved out of the house  – due to the baby on the way – and into the studio in our backyard. We’re pretty lucky to have that studio in the first place.

Half of the studio will be storage for both our belongings and our tools, and the other half will be all mine! Obviously I won’t be able to get in there that often, but when I do, I will have free range to do what I want! To help get the creative juices flowing, I found some pretty inspiring workspaces and wanted to share them with you!

From A Beautiful Mess

From A Beautiful Mess

Of course I love this space from A Beautiful Mess. It would be perfect for the tool storage, and I could put a lot of my bigger supplies there, along with the little ones. I would just need to figure out a way to include the personal belongings storage and make it all work. This is definitely a good place to start, though.

From Karson Butler Events on Inspired by This

From Karson Butler Events on Inspired by This

I have a multitude of notebooks, ranging from big and small, and everything in between. I try to keep one with me at all times in case I get inspired by something. Since I often write in different notebooks, the ideas and concepts often get lost. I would love to have a chalkboard wall with a corkboard so I can keep track of all my crazy ideas. And there is just something about this chalkboard wall from the design studio of Karson Butler Events, and featured on Inspired by This. It just screams “CREATE IN HERE!” (hence the caps).

From Paper Fashion, featured on Glitter Guide

From Paper Fashion, featured on Glitter Guide

Katie Rodgers from Paper Fashion sure knows how to make a comfy workspace. I would probably opt out of putting a couch in the room – strictly out of fear that I would just end up lying on it the whole time – but I would definitely love to have the lights up, and I love all of the bright colors. It totally brightens the mood and gets you energized…perfect for getting to work. You can see more of this workspace over at Glitter Guide.

From Heart Handmade UK

From Heart Handmade UK

What really caught my attention about this room by Heart Handmade UK was the use of storage, especially this fabric cabinet. All of my fabric ends up in a bin and then is forgotten. If I kept it visible like that, it might actually get put to use – what a thought! I also love the vintage odds and ends she has decorating her space. See the entire craft room tour by clicking on her blog link above.

Have a fun creative workspace to share? See something that inspires you? Share it in the comments and join the fun by connecting with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google + and Twitter!

Meet the Maker: Rosaura Unangst

unnamed

Photo by Carmen Salazar Photography

While many may view Instagram as simply a photo-sharing app (that is, after all, what it is), I love that I have actually made a handful of connections on there – whether it’s finding a new person through comments or through something of theirs that someone else has shared – and I love it even more when that person happens to live in my town.

Rosaura Unangst, 26, lives in Midtown in Sacramento and runs Pigment and Parchment, her hand lettering and watercolor business. She designs for weddings, graduations, babies and more. She also sells prints and holds watercolor and lettering workshops in her studio in Midtown and around California. I am so happy to be sharing just a little bit of her story today.

What inspired you to start hand lettering, when did you first get into it? I’ve hand lettered since pre-school! I dabbled a bit in graffiti style in high school (mainly due to a big crush I had on a very talented artist named Vlad) but I think when I was 19 and a sign artist at Trader Joe’s that’s the first time I really started upping my game.

What were some of your first lettering projects? The first I vividly remember was making a sign for a Sadie Hawkins dance in graffiti lettering. (Again- that art nerd crush I had)
What pushed you to start your workshops, and what have you learned from them so far? I have done informal ones with family and friends for years and I was looking for a way to incorporate engaging with the community with my art business. It was a natural fit and is so much healthier for me (creating tends to be very isolating & as much as I like solitude I don’t want to become a total recluse). I’ve learned how therapeutic and universal creating is. I’ve always known this to be true for myself but after hearing countless people say how relaxing it is as they leave my workshop I’m on a one woman mission to get this message out there to everyone.
How much time do you spend on creating vs workshops vs businessy stuff? It really depends. There has to be balance between both which can be hard because I only want to create and host workshops but half the time I do have to promote, set up listings and websites, deal with printing and other businessy stuff. A goal of mine is to get an art agent so they can deal with that & I can focus more on making!
P&P Workshop

Photo by Lacey M. Carroll

How do you best manage everything with your caretaking job and personal life? There’s no perfect balance. That’s a myth. It’s all a work in progress and correcting when any one thing is taking over too much time. In the past year or so I’ve been a lot kinder to myself and allowed myself to accept I can’t do it all and that’s ok. Instead I focus on what I have accomplished and that leaves me feeling more empowered to haul ass again the next day!

Favorite place you’ve hosted a workshop so far? My in-laws’ patio overlooking Hermosa Beach. Life doesn’t get any better than when you can smell salt in the air.
What does your studio look like right now? A bit messy always but there is order in the chaos- not that anyone else would know it but I’ve got a visual memory and know exactly where everything is. It’s a lot better in our current home than ever before because I’ve got a swivel door that used to be a Murphy hideaway bed in the 40s and now houses all my crafting stuff and props. There’s a vintage bar cart with more of my fine art supplies, a rolling desk that doubles as a mini photo studio, a long desk for the computer, giant scanner & giant printer, a bookcase with all my reference art books & my cat Elphaba’s corner of shame (her litter box complete with styled cat supplies).
What do you think was one of the best business moves you made to get you to where you are today? I wouldn’t call it a business move but it’s definitely gotten me where I am today… going to a clinic and getting help with an eating disorder last year. Therapy taught me about living in the present, confidence, self worth, creating a life I choose and so much more. There is a reason my past art businesses and ventures weren’t as successful in the past and I think my personal life and issues were absolutely holding me back. Learning to take care of myself has not only done wonders for my personal life but it has everything to do with how I put myself out there as an artist today.
How do you motivate yourself every morning? Hm… Jasmine tea or fresh ground drip coffee. In truth- every morning I wake up to likes, comments and new followers on Instagram and though I don’t need validation from that I also can’t say it isn’t motivation to get moving on creating more awesome stuff. It’s really the comments every once in a while from a person really touched or inspired by my artwork that gives me enough motivation for a week. 
P&P art

Photo by Lacey M. Carroll

What do you do if you need to unwind? I mindfully do dishes (warm water & I splurge on the good smelling soap from Method), errands (surprising but they get me out of the house and walking around while not completely taking a break from life- two birds one stone!), play board games & go watch art house films with my husband Nathan.

Who are your biggest inspirations? My contemporaries- Katie Daisy, Lisa Congdon, Emily McDowell, Anna Rifle Bond & Molly Jaques. Talk about a power house of kick ass women. Earlier Inspiration- Frida Kahlo, Judy Garland, Vincent Van Gogh, Mid Century Design, Old Musicals

Favorite books on creative lettering? The bible is Creative Lettering by Jenny Doh (which I’m contributing to the sequel!! EEK!) Modern Calligraphy is a good resource too. I’ve got a few others but honestly just absorbing lettering from back when all advertising was done without the use of computers is where a lot of inspiration of creative lettering comes from.

Best/scariest thing about running your own creative business? The best part is I know I’m doing the thing that I’m best at. I am contributing to culture. Art is connecting to humanity on a level that strips away all the bullshit. The scariest part used to be not being seen as having a real job by lots of people- but now that I’ve made my peace with that I’d say the scary part is probably dealing with all the businessy stuff. I am learning, I am figuring it out slowly but surely but it doesn’t come naturally to me

Favorite thing about what you do? There is a certain pride and joy when you make something from nothing. To sum up & show off my musicals nerdiness- “The opposite of war isn’t peace. It’s creation.” (Johnathan Larson- Rent) Art connects you to other humans on a level nothing else can reach.

What has been one of your favorite projects/commissions that you have worked on? Oh that’s a tough one. A full room Peter Pan mural always had a special place in my heart. I’ve always encouraged people to never grow up.

suitcase

Photo from Rosaura Unangst

Best business advice you’ve received? Be yourself. Be authentic. Cuss if you want to. (Thanks Carmen & Dena!)

What kind of projects do you hope to work on next? Custom wedding suites that really tell the story of the couple. I’d love to do some more murals- it’s been a while but it’s like riding a bike. I’m bringing back the funky portraits I used to do- some of those would be fun!

Dream place to host a workshop? India. I’d want to cohost and start with someone teaching us the process of learning about pigment and making dyes and paint, then end with using the paint and/or dyes we just made to create art! Essentially the ‘farm to fork’ version of a workshop.

What advice do you have for people who are just starting their creative businesses? Be careful with spending a lot of time looking at what other people are creating. Of course you have to a bit to get a feel for what people are buying, charging and what’s already out there so you’re not offering the exact same thing. BUT! If you feel yourself being too influenced by other people’s styles or tastes and that starts to overpower your own aesthetic it’s time to unplug the computer and get back to your roots and your own eye. You’ll never please everyone. Own it. The people who like your style will like you that much more for not being the same as the mainstream offering.

thankyou

Photo from Rosaura Unangst

You can find out more about Rosaura Unangst and Pigment and Parchment by visiting her website, where she has a schedule of her workshops, links to her social media accounts (like her super cool Instagram) and details on her design services and pricing. She has printables for sale in her Etsy shop and her next workshops are in Santa Cruz on the 26th. There will also be a hand lettering workshop in Sacramento on the 31st.

I have a few spots open for Meet the Maker profiles this year so if you know someone who should be featured, let me know in the comments and connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google + and Pinterest! Keep on creating!

Respect Your Mother – A Fundraiser

Respect Your Mother

Quite some time ago, I happened upon Out of the Dark – a nonprofit in the UK where volunteers work with underprivileged kids to restore old furniture. The furniture is then sold online and the proceeds go back to the charity. Pretty awesome idea. I was so inspired by this, that I decided to bring it to Sacramento.

Luckily, I have volunteered for Vox – a local nonprofit art studio – on a fundraiser before, and I love the people behind it. I told Eric, one of the directors, about my idea and he loved it. We decided to get a fundraiser going to support the program, and there, Respect Your Mother was born.

Since Vox is near the closing of their brick and mortar and concentrating on working more in the community and supporting different local charities, this is the perfect time to reach out to another nonprofit. So we are working with another amazing local nonprofit Sol Collective, and the fundraiser will be held there.

The fundraiser will be held May 10, and we are even doing a couple things before the event:

  • Clothing Drive – We are working with California Clothing Recyclers to hold a clothing drive where people are encouraged to donate a large bag of clothing and/or linens at any of our participating locations. Those bags will be picked up by California Clothing Recyclers to be recycled, and the money earned will be donated back to our Charity.
  • Online Fundraiser – We are planning an online fundraiser for the week of May 4 – 10 and we are hoping to work with different eco-friendly online businesses to raise money for Out of the Dark, since they inspired this program. I haven’t worked out all of the details but I’m hoping to do something where people could purchase something and then enter a code for the proceeds to go to Out of the Dark.

At the fundraiser, we are hoping to have ten pieces of furniture that have all been painted by local artists and will be auctioned off. There will also be a raffle with goodies and gift cards from local businesses. We’re looking for ten eco-friendly vendors who want to purchase booth space for $25 to sell their goods and we’re hoping for an acoustic musician or two.

I’m still working on getting all of the information and graphics out, but I’m feeling really good about this event. I hope this program will succeed, because I would love to be able to work with kids on creating beautiful pieces from unwanted furniture. I think it’s so good to teach kids about working with their hands, taking pride in what they do and restoring something from start to finish.

If you would like to participate in this fundraiser, please let me know. There is lots you can do – whether you are in Sacramento, or across the globe. I will be posting more information weekly and you can contact me through e-mail or through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Google +. I will also be posting some inspiration on Pinterest so check that out, too!

Finding my Style

Last week, it dawned on me. It was past 9 pm on any given night, and I was still in my PJ’s. No, I’m not depressed. I’m a happy stay-at-home mom who doesn’t get out and about as much I used to and sometimes I forget to change out of my PJ’s. And sometimes I shower and then put clean PJ’s back on.

And this is when it dawned on me. “Wow–I have really let go of myself,” I thought. But have I?

Me, my baby, and my PJ's

Me, my baby, and my PJ’s

I’ve never been a big fan of fashion. Style, yes. Fashion, no. Only recently did I discover there was a difference. I always just wore what I thought was cool – and sometimes other people dug it, and other times, random people would say “uhhh…what’s that on your head” “It’s a head wrap, people! I just don’t know how to wear it. Dang!”

During high school, we Catholic school girls had it pretty easy in the outfit department. We wore uniforms and sometimes I would paint my shoes with nail polish and wear argyle socks to be different. I’m a real rebel. I had a small group of friends and we cared more about music than anything else in the world.

After high school, I got a job at Picture People. If you’re unfamiliar, it’s a photo studio chain that specializes in babies and dogs. I worked there for four years, and by the time I left, I could categorize the customers by what time of day it was. Weekday mornings – afternoon: stay-at-home moms and dog lovers, weekday afternoons – business moms who schlepped their kids from school to the mall for their annual photos, weekends – dads.

Again, the outfit choice was easy. We had a uniform (I’m seeing a theme here) and a spinny hat. Nothing else I could wear would ever distract anyone from the spinny hat. I would snicker at all of the stay-at-home moms, swearing that would never be me. As if I was doing any better.

Then, there was College. In Humboldt. I could honestly say I don’t even remember what I wore – it was Humboldt.

Then, there was my 20s. Oh, the 20s. Where I wore patterned tights with a patterned skirt and a tiger shirt. All different patterns. Because I wanted to, dammit. I would wear fedoras with jean shorts that I cut myself and were all jagged and rough. And I didn’t care.

Fake fishing near Lake Tahoe. I had a little boombox shaved into my head

Fake fishing near Lake Tahoe. I had a little boombox shaved into my head

And now, here I am. In my jammies, looking at my chipped nails and too overwhelmed by my closet to confidentially pick out an outfit. But look where I’ve come. I shower daily, I learned to cook and clean all in a little over a year, I’m going to the College of my dreams and I have an amazing kid and boyfriend. Not too shabby. But still, I miss that fearless abandonment I had every time I went through my closet. I miss wearing something truly unique instead of the same ol thing.

Kate Payne wrote in Hip Girls Guide to Homemaking that work-at-home-ians should shower and get ready like they’re going to work every morning. Make yourself look all business-casual and you will be more productive throughout your day, she says. Well, it can’t hurt.

I’m going to make it a point to go through my closet and stick with the clothes I truly feel speak to me. The rest, I can donate to our clothing recycling program we’re doing as part of our fundraiser for Vox. Then, I’m going to make it a point to get fancy during the week. To actually put on some adult clothes and maybe even brush my hair.

Because, as I tell Sam all the time – if it’s important to you, you will make time for it.

What is your style? If you’re a mom, do you feel like you lost any of it when you had your babe? How did you find it again? Let’s talk about it.

Project 2014

Image from Oh My! Handmade Goodness

Image from Oh My! Handmade Goodness

One of the biggest reasons for me starting my blog is that I had a lot of ideas and projects running through my head and was tired of searching for the random notebook I wrote them down in. I also wanted to connect with other creative people who could inspire and move me to work on all of those projects I’ve been holding off on, and I wanted to find new ideas to build on and grow from.

When I went to write my post today, I needed some inspiration. While I had a lot I wanted to say, I didn’t really know how I wanted to say it. So I ventured over to Oh My! Handmade to see what the monthly discussion theme was. Each month, there is a new theme for bloggers and creatives alike to use as inspiration for their businesses. This month’s theme was Project 2014: Choose Your Own Adventures. This felt like the perfect time to share a project I have been working on!

A couple years ago, I found a nonprofit art studio named Vox through Twitter, and I started volunteering for them. With a few friends, I helped organize one fundraiser for them called Art Speaks. It was a huge success and because of all the community support, it was a lot bigger than I had ever imagined. Unfortunately, Vox has run into some funding problems and will probably have to close their brick and mortar studio.

A little piece of Art Speaks

A little piece of Art Speaks

Luckily, creative people are always open to new ideas, and when we’re lucky, those ideas can turn into solutions. Before I found out about their funding issues, I brought up an idea of restoring furniture with children at their studio. It was something I would hope to get my daughter involved in when she was old enough. Since they will be closing the studio soon, we have decided to turn it into more of a mobile community studio, where can work with other organizations and involve more of a community.

To kick things off, we have come up with a fundraiser to help raise money for our new project, and to raise money for another nonprofit who is doing the same thing – Out of the Dark in the UK. While the fundraiser will be in-person, we are hoping to add an online component as well.

Photo from Out of the Dark

Photo from Out of the Dark

The most important goals at the moment are:

  • We need a name for the fundraiser – something that implies renewal and restoration. That is our theme for the project and the fundraiser as a whole.
  • A location for the fundraiser – Since Vox is closing down soon, we don’t want to count on the studio as a venue. There are a few choices in Sacramento, and we want to work with an organization/company that we can continue to work with in the future.
  • A date – We need enough time to send info to local publications and get everyone involved.

There is a lot of work to get done, and I’m actually pretty excited about getting to everything. This is going to be such an amazing experience, for many reasons. I have wanted to get into community organization and promotion, so this will help me decide if that’s truly what I want.

It will also allow me to practice my graphic design more, and to use my writing skills to help get my ideas across. It will also be the first time that Kandyce and I will have a booth for Sweet Mariposa, so we will need to get everything together for that.

This will be a huge moment, not only for Vox, but also for my creative business. It will help guide me to what I really want to do, and I’m excited to see where it takes me.

What projects are you working on? Do you want to get involved in my project? Connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google + and Pinterest, and you can e-mail me!

Yo Momma Monday: Emmaline Lamond

yo momma mondayMeet Emmaline Lamond, 36, from Mornington, Victoria, Australia. She is the beautifully creative mind behind Coco Press and is mama to her beautiful one-year-old daughter, Amelie. I met Emmaline through a Giveaway she was hosting and I was lucky enough to win her amazing hand-printed cards! Today, I’m honored to share her story with you.

9b3eb64e335911e3a62322000ab698eb_8

Emmaline was first introduced to lincout printing in her high-school art class. After school, she had to put her creative ventures aside and as she says, “get on with life,” but decided to take them back up again after she found her old art supplies in a box during a recent move.

“I found my printing gear and fell in love, again. At the time I was working in a stressful corporate job, I found that carving a lino block in preparation for printing was incredibly stress relieving. I was hooked and my obsession has continued to grow over the last few years to a point where I now have a studio over flowing with ink, printing gear and most importantly, three beautiful presses.”

So, what exactly is linocut printing, you ask? I know, I had the same question and Emmaline filled me in a little of the process.

“Lino cutting is a method of relief printing. Its lots of fun, well at least I think so. You basically start with a sheet of lino, I use a softer vinyl product and carve into it with special tools that allow you to cut away the negative space, this leaves only the positive space (the actual parts that print).”

“Think of it as a great big hand carved stamp that you then ink up with a roller (brayer) and then stamp onto paper, with the help of a printing press. I love the tactile nature of printing, I love the problem solving involved, the subtle tweaking you have to do to get it just right.”

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

Emmaline works with a press from the ’70s as newer machines are not really being manufactured right now, but to my surprise, she informed me that there are people who use reconditioned machines that date back to the 1900’s! She says that she would love an older press, but they are harder to find – and more expensive – in Australia than in America.

“I do love that they each have their own history, where have they come from who has worked and created on them in the past? For the time being, I am content to work with my lovely Chandler and Price table top and my smaller bright red Adana table top press.”

While Emmaline had been involved in craft fairs for a few years, she did not decide to make this a full-time business until September 2012, when she was put on maternity leave.

“I have been working very hard for the last 12 months or so to build up my business, create a larger range of cards and prints, find the right craft markets for my work (we moved interstate at the same time I started my business), learn the finer points of letterpress printing all while learning to be a mum for the first time!”

She recently launched the invitation side of her business, and she also launched her wedding stationary at a local Bridal Expo. Since she is still building that part, she says that most of her sales come from her letterpress cards rather than her wedding stationary.

Amelie is already a big helper! Photo from Emmaline Lamond

Amelie is already a big helper! Photo from Emmaline Lamond

“I LOVE working with couples to create their perfect wedding stationery. I adore hearing all about their big dreams for their big day, the dress, the location the colour scheme, all of it. It really inspires me to create something unique and beautiful just for them, something that will remain a treasured keepsake they can pull out as the years pass and they celebrate many anniversaries together.”

Like many of us new moms (ok, probably all of us), Emmaline hasn’t had a normal work day since having her little girl last year, and she says her work style has definitely changed.

“I try to keep a to-do list at hand and do my best to work my way through it in 10-minute chunks, as this is usually the longest my little girl will play independently. There is always something to do, drawing, refining my designs in Photoshop, cutting paper, printing, packaging, photographing my products, listing my products… the list goes on and on!”

All of the designs on Emmaline’s cards, invitations and linocut prints are created by her. She says she is drawn to Art Nouveau and whimsical images, and also loves creating her own quirky designs for cards and invites. As for the wedding side, she opts out of the traditional wedding designs, as she says there are plenty of people who “do traditional designs way better than me.”

“But no one else can create my designs exactly like I do. All my designs start with an idea, an inkling, a whimsical daydream that I turn into a drawing and the drawings I like the most are converted into digital images with the help of a scanner, Photoshop and my trusty Wacom tablet. These digital images are then made into photopolymer plates that are used for the actual printing.”

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

While Emmaline admits that being a new mom and starting her creative business can be a little tough, she says that she loves every minute of it.

“I feel so privileged to be in a position to make my small dream of entrepreneurship come true. I am totally motivated by my daughter I want to be able to show her that it is possible to live the life you dream of, for me that means building a sustainable business that will allow me to contribute to our household whilst building a loving and nurturing home for my little family.”

Although Emmaline works alone, her partner helps with the little one on the weekends so she can spend a few hours printing on the weekend. She waited until her daughter was a little older to return to the craft fair scene, and now her daughter gets more compliments than her art does!

I love everything about being a mum. I adore my little girl. I could complain about lack of sleep and those downsides you hear other people talk of but I don’t really mind, she’s only this little for such a short time that I just want to enjoy it all.”

She is focusing on craft shows that are close to her home, and fortunately she lives in a beautiful beachside area which is popular for tourists, and therefore also popular for craft shows. She says that the best and worst part about running her own business is that you live and breathe it.

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

“I love that I have so much passion and drive to make this a success but I also know that I should step away from it more often to live in the moment with my baby and my partner.

While Emmaline has a hard time picking her favorite thing about the entire creative process, she can easily pinpoint her favorite part of the printing process.

“That first time you get to see a new print, peeling the paper back off the printing plate to see the image revealed for the first time- its just magic!”

Emmaline describes her personal style as quirky, whimsical and fun, and she wants people to be able to recognize her work the moment they see it.

“I think it’s also important to have a bit of a sense of humour about your work and to realise that what you create isn’t going to appeal to everyone.”

She recently started creating her own tote bags, and said that they are now on the sidelines while she perfects them, but that won’t last long. And as for the future of her creative business as a whole, well – you will just have to wait and see!

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

Photo from Emmaline Lamond

I have huge plans for the future, I’m working on a top secret kick arse idea a the moment, one that will take lots of hard work and maybe more risk than I am used to but one that I am determined to bring to fruition, I am hoping to unveil it all next summer! So stay tuned for more exciting news as I bring the project together.”